Agreement On Government Procurement (Gpa) Of The World Trade Organization



The MPA applies to purchases by any contractual means, including purchase, lease or lease with or without an option to purchase. It applies to companies that each signatory country has listed in Schedule I (link offsite) of the agreement. Appendix I of Schedule I is the list of entities covered by headquarters, Schedule 2 of central government entities and Schedule 3 of the other entities. The Public Procurement Agreement (GPA) is a multi-lateral agreement, under the auspices of the World Trade Organization (WTO), which governs the purchase of goods and services by the public authorities of the contracting parties, based on the principles of openness, transparency and non-discrimination. The Public Procurement Agreement (GPA) requires that open, fair and transparent conditions of competition be guaranteed for public procurement. To this end, the text of the agreement contains general principles and detailed procedural requirements that the parties to the GPA must apply to covered purchasing activities. In addition, the WTO secretariat has implemented technical cooperation measures to help developing and least developed countries participate effectively in the WTO`s procurement work. Public procurement accounts for an average of 10-15% of an economy`s GDP. It is an important market and an important aspect of international trade. The WTO`s work in the area of public procurement aims to promote transparency, integrity and competition in this market.

The current signatories to this agreement (april 2014) are: Canada, Chinese Taipei, the European Union – whose member states are Austria, Belgium, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands (including Aruba), Poland, Portugal, Slovakia , Slovenia, Sweden and the United Kingdom – Hong Kong, Iceland, South Korea, Liechtenstein, Singapore, Switzerland and the United States. Any other WTO member government may accede to this agreement on terms agreed by that government and the current signatories. As a result, the first Tokyo Round Code on Government Procurement was signed in 1979 and came into force in 1981.